Y

ANNE YARDE (d.1507)
Anne Yarde was the daughter of Thomas Yarde or Yerde of Denton Court, Kent and Joan Scot of Scot’s Hall (d.1492+). Anne’s mother’s second husband was Henry Grey of Ketteringham (d.1492). He left Ketteringham to his widow, with reversion to her daughter. Anne was also the heiress of Sir William Appleyard, who seems to have been the father of Grey’s first wife, Emma. By 1478, Anne had married Thomas Heveningham (d. January 31, 1499/1500), by whom she had ten children, including John, Robert, Audrey, and Anne. Portrait: memorial brass.

WELTHIAN YARDE (d.1521+)
Welthian (Walthera/Weltian/Walthean) Yarde was born in Devonshire. Around 1493, she married Walter Yorke, mayor of Exeter, by whom she had a son, Roger (c.1494-February 2, 1535). Her second husband was Thomas Drelne. In around January 1508, she married Sir Hugh Luttrell of East Quantockshead, Somerset (d. February 1521). Following his death, she claimed the manor of East Quantockshead as part of her jointure but this was contested by her stepson, Sir Andrew Luttrell. Her bill of complaint against him claimed that he had seized all her goods and chattels. On June 7, 1521, a brawl took place in Quantock Park in which a man was killed. The feud seems to have been settled with a marriage, that of Roger Yorke to Hugh Luttrell’s daughter Eleanor.

ELIZABETH YARFORD
see ELIZABETH WOLSTON

ELIZABETH YATE (d.1581+)
Elizabeth Yate was the daughter of James Yate of Buckland, Berkshire (d.1544+) and Mary Fettiplace. She was a nun at Syon until Syon was dissolved in 1539, at which point Elizabeth returned to Buckland to live and brought several of the other nuns with her. By 1556, seven former nuns were living at Lyford Grange, the home of Elizabeth’s kinsman, Thomas Yate, and his wife Anne (or Agnes). As a widow, Anne Yate (d.1580) joined the Brigittine order. After Queen Elizabeth restored the New Religion to England in 1558, Syon Abbey was refounded in Mechlin. The Lyford Grange nuns emigrated to Belgium, but Elizabeth Yate and seven others, including Catherine Kingsmill, Juliana Harman, Joan Lowe, and Elizabeth Sanders, later returned. On July 17, 1581, the Jesuit priest Edmund Campion was arrested at Lyford Grange, along with several other men. Some accounts say two nuns, Catherine Kingsmill and Juliana Harman, had been arrested and taken away the previous day. Other accounts indicate that none of the women were charged.

FRANCES YATE
see FRANCES WHITE

JANE YATE
see JANE TICHBORNE

MARGARET YAXLEY
see MARGARET LEVENTHORPE

GRISEL YELVERTON (c.1567-August 4, 1635)
Grisel Yelverton was the daughter of William Yelverton of Rougham, Norfolk (d. August 19, 1586) and Jane Cocket. Her first husband was Thomas LeStrange of Hunstanton, who, according to Augustus Jessopp in One Generation of a Norfolk House, died at eighteen on February 1, 1582. According to a document dated 15 August 27 Elizabeth (1585), Grisel received the manors of East Lexham and West Lexham, Durham for life in arbitration per articles of agreement dated 19 March 25 Elizabeth (1583). In 1586, she married Philip Wodehouse or Woodhouse of Kimberley, Norfolk (1562-October 30, 1623). Their children were Thomas (d.1658), Roger (d.1634), Philip, Elizabeth, John, a second John, Margaret, and Miles (d.1604). In about 1588, when Grisel was near death after childbirth, her husband, who “dearly loved his wife,” was persuaded to allow her to receive extreme unction from a Catholic priest. Her immediate recovery led Philip Wodehouse to temporarily convert to Catholicism, but he later “fell back into heresy” and persuaded Grisel to conform. In 1601, Charles Yelverton wrote that his aunt, Jane Lumner, was still a devout Catholic but that his father’s other sister, wife of Sir Philip Wodehouse, “on account of the madness of her husband, which very frequently broke out against her, has lately fallen from the Church.”

JANE YELVERTON (d.1615+)
Jane Yelverton was the daughter of William Yelverton of Rougham, Norfolk (d. August 19, 1586) and Jane Cocket. On July 5, 1569 a license was issued for her marriage to Edward Lumner of Mannington, Norfolk (April 10, 1555-1588). In her petition to the court of Chancery in 1597 she refers to herself as “being very well descended, and having also received a good portion in marriage.” They had two daughters, Mary (b. February 2, 1579) and Elizabeth (b. December 21, 1582, apparently in Guernsey), but when Lumner died in debt he had already spent Jane’s dowry. She was obliged to make her home with her widowed brother, Edward, serving as his housekeeper. At that time, she did not sympathize with what Augustus Jessopp in One Generation of a Norfolk House calls “his enthusiasm for the Roman doctrine and ritual.” In his notes, however, Jessopp calls her “an obstinate Recusant” and states that her name is found in the lists of recusants for some twenty years, until 1615. During that time she changed her residence several times, sinking deeper and deeper into poverty, in large part because of the fines she was obliged to pay. In 1615, she was living with her two daughters at Haynford. One online genealogy gives her another husband named John Dodge but provides no further details.

MARGERY YELVERTON
see MARGERY MORLEY

JOAN YEOMANS
see JOAN BROWNE

KATHERINE YONGE
see KATHERINE BARKER

ANNE YORKE (d.1600+)
Anne Yorke was the daughter of Sir John Yorke of Gouthwaite, Yorkshire (d.1569) and Anne Smyth (d. August 1575). From 1546, the family home was a house in St. Stephen Walbrook, London. The marriage intentions for Anne’s wedding to William Hilton of Hilton Castle, Durham and Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland (d. September 1600) are dated February 21, 1557/8. He was knighted in 1570. Their children were Thomas (d.1598), Syrack (bp. November 25, 1576), Richard (bp. April 13,1578), Henry, Anne, Catherine, and Nathaniel. In the wills left by her mother and father, Anne is referred to as “my daughter Hilton.” Her father left her an agate set in gold with four diamonds on the sides of it. Her mother left her a velvet gown and a cloak. In 1593, when the activities of priests in the northeast of England were being investigated, Lord Burghley made mention in a letter to “that infamous strumpet the lady Hilton.” The History of Parliament states that this is probably a reference to Anne, although there is a slight possibility it refers to her daughter-in-law, Anne Bowes, wife of her eldest son Thomas.

ANNE YORKE
see ANNE SMYTH

PHILIPPA YORKE (1524-November 1597)
Philippa Yorke was the daughter of Richard Yorke, according the the History of Parliament entry for her second husband. Elsewhere, however, her parents are given as Roger Yorke of Willington, Somerset (1490-February 2, 1535) and Eleanor Luttrell (1495-1530). In 1543, she married Richard Parker of North Molton, Devonshire (1520-1547). By a marriage settlement dated February 10, 1549, she married Roger Prideaux of Soldon, Devonshire and London (1523-January 8, 1582). Their children were Nicholas (1549-January 25, 1628), Elizabeth (b.1552), Edmund (1555-February 28, 1623), and another daughter, Wilmot (1559-April 1622). Prideauxdowered Philippa with two manors in Cornwall. In his will, dated May 13, 1579, he specified that his wife was to have the use of the property and house at Soldon for life with the reversion to Nicholas. He added a codicil on January 2, 1582 and the will was probated on January 8, 1582. At that time, his lands were valued at £88/annum. When there was a dispute over the title to some of the lands left to her, Philippa was assisted in petitioning for redress, as late as 1589, by Humphrey Specote of Thornbury, Devon, a fellow MP with her late husband.

WELTHIAN YORKE
see WELTHIAN YARDE

ELEANOR YOULE (d.1574)
Eleanor Youle was one of three daughters of Robert Youle of Worcester (c.1497-1561), a clothier, and his first wife Eleanor. The three shared an inheritance of £800 and various properties in Worcester and Worcestershire. Eleanor married John Walsgrove alias Fleet (d.1567), a Worcester merchant. According to the entry for her son Thomas (d.c.1613) in the History of Parliament, he had pasture land on lease but his mother disputed his title, preventing him from claiming it until after her death.

JANE YOUNG
see JANE KYNASTON

JOAN YOUNG
see JOAN LYTE; JOAN WADHAM